Product Theaters

Product Theaters provide an opportunity for Exhibitors to present information about their products, services, or new research findings to asm2015 attendees. The material presented in a Product Theater may be promotional and may concentrate on one specific product; therefore, these sessions are considered promotional and do not offer continuing education credits.  The Product Theater booth is located in Exhibit Hall E.

SUNDAY, MAY 31

Versatile New DNA Tools to Accelerate Your Research
Supported by Integrated DNA Technologies
11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Exhibit Hall
Product Theater Booth 272

Speaker:
Michel Cannieux, PhD, MBA
Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), Director of Product Commercialization

Program Overview:
With gBlocks® Gene Fragments, Integrated DNA Technologies offers a rapid and reliable method to build and clone the genes you need at a fraction of the cost of full gene synthesis services. gBlocks Gene Fragments are 125–2000 bp, double-stranded, sequence-verified DNA blocks that ship in only a few working days. Gene fragments can be used for many applications, including affordable and easy gene construction or modification, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, and use as qPCR standards. gBlocks Gene Fragments are also available in libraries and plates. The presentation will provide researchers with ideas on accelerating their research through the review of applications and case studies.

 

New Options in Microbiology Testing
Supported by Roche Diagnostics
12:00 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Exhibit Hall
Product Theater Booth 272
Lunch will be provided

Speaker:
John Osiecki PhD
Director of Microbiology and CTNG Scientific Affairs, Roche Molecular Systems

Program Overview:
MRSA/SA surveillance remains an important tool in the fight against HAIs. This workshop will discuss the importance of HAI testing and also provide the latest information and science behind the new microbiology tests coming from Roche on the cobas®4800 system. There will be information about HAI and sexually transmitted disease testing.

 

Rapid Diagnostics: A Foundation for the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics
Supported by BacterioScan
1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Exhibit Hall
Product Theater Booth 272

Speaker:
Geraldine Hall, PhD, Ret. Staff of Clinical Microbiology, Cleveland Clinic, and Professor of Pathology at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University

Program Overview:
Determining the presence of bacteria in patient specimens using conventional methods can take three days or more for detection and an additional one to two days to determine if that bacteria is susceptible to antibiotics. The impact of these delays in detection and susceptibility can lead to ineffective, unnecessary treatment with antimicrobial drugs and also drives the development of antimicrobial resistance.

The difficulty clinicians face in accurately and quickly identifying bacterial presence and choosing the right antimicrobial for treatment contributes to escalating heath care costs, longer lengths of hospital stays and most importantly, poor patient outcomes.

The objectives of this presentation are to describe the impact of existing and novel methods available for rapid bacterial detection and antimicrobial resistance testing and the integration of these rapid tests into the laboratory as opportunities to improve antimicrobial use and clinical and economic outcomes.

 

MONDAY, JUNE 1

Geospatial Resolution of Human and Microbial Diversity Using City-Scale Metagenomics
Supported by Illumina, Inc.
11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Exhibit Hall
Product Theater Booth 272

Speaker:
Christopher Mason, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Institute for Computational Biomedicine at Cornell University

Program Overview:
Technological advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have created an opportunity for rapid genetic studies of microbes and their hosts, giving scientists and clinicians a new molecular view of humans and their microbiomes and metagenomes. However, a metagenome profile has never been created for an entire city, which is an essential baseline for contextualizing the microbial changes within a person. Here, we have created a "pathogen map," or “PathoMap,” of the entire New York City (NYC) subway system and several above-ground areas, which is currently being used to track the microbiotic population and genetic dynamics of the system over time. We built a mobile app for real-time data entry, GPS-tagging, and timestamp marking; this was implemented for 1,435 samples that catalogued all 468 subway stations in NYC, creating a molecular catalog of over 600 species identified from shotgun (125x125bp) sequencing. Yet, our data show 48% of the DNA does not match any known species, indicating a wealth of discovery left in metagenomics and genome assembly projects. Strikingly, a “molecular echo” can be seen from marine-related bacteria in a subway station flooded by Hurricane Sandy, distinct from the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, showing the persistence of some bacteria from flooding events. We also demonstrated how “public genomes” can predict human ancestry from human DNA left on surfaces, and they also showed a high correlation to the U.S. Census data demographics (black, white, Hispanic, Asian). Finally, we show that metagenomics profiling can reveal the likely source of antibiotic (tetracycline) resistance, and that both shotgun and rDNA sequence data reveal widespread eukaryotic diversity across the stations, including high levels of insect, human, and rat DNA, which themselves contribute to the metagenome. These data provide the first baseline molecular map of an entire city, and the station-specific microbiome and DNA profiles implicate these methods as a forensic tool for tracking individuals as they move through a city. We have now initiated a project to student the metagenomics and metadesign of subways and urban biomes (www.metasub.org) in 16 cities around the world, integrating the goals of scientists, clinicians, architecture firms, transit authorities, artists, and policy makers to enable “smart cities."

 

TUESDAY, JUNE 2

7-plex and 10-plex PCR assays for the detection of ampCs, blaCTX-Ms and 5 Carbapenamase genes using Rapid PCR Amplification
Supported by Streck
11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Exhibit Hall
Product Theater Booth 272

Speaker:
Nancy D. Hanson, PhD
Professor and Director of the Center for Research, Anti-Infectives and Biotechnology, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology at Creighton University

Program Overview:
Gram-negative organisms resistant to β-Lactams often produce multiple β-Lactamases, making phenotypic detection of organisms producing medically important β-Lactamases difficult. Identification of these resistance mechanisms is paramount in controlling the spread of infection and can help determine the best therapeutic options for patients. Molecular diagnostics can aid in detecting resistance mechanisms; however, PCR amplification using conventional or real-time PCR cyclers can take 2 to 3 hours to complete. This presentation describes a series of multiplex PCR assay kits that detect 9 important β-Lactamase gene families (blaOXA-48, blaCMY-2, blaDHA, blaVIM, blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP-1, blaCTX-M-14, and blaCTX-M-15) or 6 plasmid-mediated ampC β-Lactamases (blaMOX, blaFOX, blaEBC, blaACC, blaCMY-2, and blaDHA). Each assay includes a primer mix vial and control vials that include an internal control gene. All are optimized for rapid PCR amplification technology. In addition, the ARM-D™ for β-Lactamase and the Philisa® ampC ID kits are available for conventional PCR applications and are being developed for real-time PCR compatibility, including rapid identification with the Philisa® Real-Time PCR System. Data presented will demonstrate the high degree of specificity and sensitivity of each assay following extensive testing using up to 300 previously validated clinical isolates that include E. coli, Klebsiella spp, Enterobacter spp., and Pseudomonas spp. These conventional and real-time PCR assays are a rapid easy to use (30-min or less) molecular diagnostic tool for detection of multiple β-Lactamase gene families of medical importance.

 

OTU-Clustering and Microbiome Analysis Made Easy: the New CLC Microbiome Analysis Module
Supported by Qiagen Bioinformatics
12:00 p.m. – 12:45 p.m.
Exhibit Hall
Product Theater Booth 272

Speaker:
Leif Schauser
Senior Bioinformatics Scientist, QIAGEN Bioinformatics

Program Overview:
The new module introduces microbiome analysis capabilities into the widely used platform for bioinformatics computing, CLC Genomics Workbench and CLC Genomics Server. The module extends the range of supported NGS applications with tools to study microbiome composition based on 16S rRNA- and other commonly used amplicon data. A unique combination of interactive visualization and powerful statistical tools allow the user to perform comparative analyses of microbiomes in the context of metadata. Preconfigured workflows guide the user through data QC, de novo and reference based OTU-clustering and statistical analyses. The integration of these powerful analysis tools into the familiar GUI of the CLC Genomics Workbench maximize ease of use.

 

Rapid Culture-Free ID of Pathogens Known to be Associated with Resistance Using Next Generation Sequencing in Clinical Research Samples
Supported by Thermo Fisher Scientific
1:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Exhibit Hall
Product Theater Booth 272

Speaker:
Abizar Lakdawalla, PhD
Sr Director, Sequencing Applications

Program Overview:
Breakthroughs in Next Generation Sequencing enable hypothesis-free high-resolution identification of bacteria and fungi without the need for culture in your research. A culture-free strategy will be presented on a specific example- the rapid identification of bacteria and fungi in blood research samples.